Aesthetician

Advances in biochemistry have led to the use of new ingredients in skin care products and procedures. Aestheticians are the skilled guides who help navigate these new services. They help their clients to understand their unique skin types, so they can purchase the most suitable products. Technological advances will allow people an even greater degree of control over their appearances, and aestheticians will help transform people for special occasions through temporary facial feature prosthetics, environmentally-responsive makeup, and other body modifications. In a world where surveillance technologies are present in public spaces, people also turn to aestheticians for help maintaining a degree of privacy and peace of mind, through the use of image-scrambling and camouflage makeup.

Technological advances will allow people an even greater degree of control over their appearances, and aestheticians will help transform people for special occasions through temporary facial feature prosthetics, environmentally-responsive makeup, and other body modifications.

Many aestheticians still work in spa or retail settings. Where beauty norms continue to favour youthful appearances, aestheticians work closely with the aging population. In the medical setting, aestheticians are able to provide plastic surgery or burn patients with options that help healing, reduce the chance of infection, and hide/minimize scarring.

 

Job Requirements / Skills

 

Aestheticians work closely with people, so it goes without saying that they need great communication and interpersonal skills. In both the retail and medical settings, it is important for aestheticians to keep up with new products, techniques, and technologies. Training to become an aesthetician involves some technical knowledge in order to learn about products, procedures, or potential allergies or interactions—but the majority of learning takes place in hands-on environments.

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