Neighbourhood Watch Officer

Drones (remote controlled flying devices that don’t have human pilots) used to only be operated by the military. In 2030, advances in technology will have made drones popular and commonly used by people for everything from shipping shoes purchased online to dropping off medicine. The popularity of drones will transform neighbourhood watch organizations.

It’s a drone-eat-drone world, but in most neighbourhoods things have never been safer.

Neighbourhood watch officers are in charge of flocks of small drones that monitor on the edges of a neighbourhood to keep an eye on suspicious comings and goings.  A few members of the flock also take fire patrol, watching for thermal hotspots with infrared cameras. It sounds like an easy job, but bear in mind that the most important thing you need to do the job is also the easiest to lose: the trust of the people you watch over.

The bad guys will use drones to search for unsecured houses and cars to jack. So, we will have to use the same technology to keep them in check. It’s a drone-eat-drone world, but in most neighbourhoods things have never been safer. At the same time, being a neighbourhood watch worker gives you an ability to snoop and the people you work for are aware of that. Expect regular audits, demands for data transparency, and police checks. It’s not easy being a neighbourhood watch worker, but there’s pride in keeping your community safe.

 

Job Requirements / Skills

A crime-free record for your background check, an official security clearance, and a certificate in property law and citizens’ rights is necessary for this job.  Although good drone-handling skills are important, the social and security aspects are absolutely essential. The homeowners whose houses you guard have to know that you are not watching them, only looking outwards, so good people skills are also useful.

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